Mental Health Statistics

Mental ill health is the second-largest cause of burden of disease in England (1)

The economic costs of mental health issues in England have been estimated at £105 billion each year (2)

The percentage of young people aged 5-15 with depression or anxiety increased from 3.9% in 2004 to 5.8% in 2017 (6)

About 20% of young people with mental ill health wait more than six months to receive care from a specialist (8)

21.2% of young people aged 11-19 report being cyberbullied in the past year (9)

34.6% of females and 19.3% of males aged 16-24 have had thoughts of suicide in their lifetime (10)

coronavirus

Coronavirus exacerbated an already pressing mental health need

mental-health-lessons

Government requirements (2020) made mental health lessons mandatory. A change welcomed by school Heads and teachers.

teachers-overwhelmed

Yet teachers are overwhelmed with existing workloads

In an average classroom, ten children will have witnessed their parents separate, eight will have experienced severe physical violence, sexual abuse or neglect, one will have experienced the death of a parent and seven will have been bullied (3)

Half of mental ill health starts by age 15 and 75% develops by age 18 (4,5)

12.8% of young people aged 5-19 meet clinical criteria for a mental health disorder (6)

Women between the ages of 16 and 24 are almost three times as likely (26%) to experience a common mental health issue as males of the same age (9%) (7)

Mental-health-concerns

1 in 6 children have a mental health concern

get-help

Only 1 in 5 get the help they need

ABOUT-SELFHARM

50% have self-harmed or attempted suicide*

* 50% of children with a diagnosed mental heath condition

  1. Public Health England. Health profile for England: 2019 [Internet]. 2019. Available from: gov.uk
  2. Mental Health Taskforce NE. The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health. 2016 [cited 2017 May 23]; Available from: england.nhs.uk
  3. Faulkner J. Class of 2011 Yearbook: How happy are young people and why does it matter? [Internet]. Doncaster; 2011 [cited 2017 May 31]. Available from: relate.org.uk
  4. Kessler RC, Berglund P, Demler O, Jin R, Merikangas KR, Walters EE. Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry [Internet]. 2005 Jun 1 [cited 2018 Oct 16];62(6):593. Available from: archpsyc.jamanetwork.com
  5. Davies SC. Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer 2013, Public Mental Health Priorities: Investing in the Evidence [Internet]. 2014. Available from: gov.uk
  6. Sadler K, Vizard T, Ford T, Goodman A, Goodman R, Mcmanus S. Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017: Trends and characteristics [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2019 Jan 7]. Available from: digital.nhs.uk
  7. McManus S, Bebbington P, Jenkins R, Brugha T. Mental health and wellbeing in England: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014 [Internet]. Leeds; 2016. Available from: content.digital.nhs.uk
  8. Mandalia D, Ford T, Hill S, Sadler K, Vizard T, Goodman A, et al. Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017: Professional services, informal support, and education [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2019 Jan 7]. Available from: digital.nhs.uk
  9. Przybylski AK, Bowes L. Cyberbullying and adolescent well-being in England: a population-based cross-sectional study. Lancet Child Adolesc Heal [Internet]. 2017 Sep 1 [cited 2018 Oct 15];1(1):19–26. Available from: sciencedirect.com
  10. McManus S, Bebbington P, Jenkins R, Brugha T. Mental health and wellbeing in England: Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014 [Internet]. Leeds; 2016. Available from: content.digital.nhs.uk